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Posted on Friday, January 22nd, 2016 by Peter Klenk

My Dad passed away this month. When he died, I found out that I was still on his Delaware County apartment lease as a cosigner. The lease was signed in 2011. I had moved out in 2013, letting the management company know that I wanted off the lease. When I asked if the management company had anything for me to sign, they replied ‘no’. When I had moved out, my Dad had let his brother, his son and his grandson move in. They are still there and the landlord’s been asking them for money for each day they are there past the end of last month. When my Dad died, I just thought I would be morally obligated to remove my Dad’s property and clean. Instead, I am getting a feeling that the landlord wants to hold me responsible for damages, utilities, and possible future rent. My Dad had nothing and I am a stay at home mom of special needs children.

You have mentioned a number of potential issues. First, the only person who has the authority to act for your dad after he has died is the executor of his estate (if he had a will) or the administrator of his estate (if he had no will). It sounds like your dad or his estate owes the landlord some money. If your dad had any money in his account or if his assets could be sold to pay the bill, that could reduce your own personal exposure in this case. If so, think about opening his estate and using that money to pay the bill and to settle any dispute with the landlord.

Suing you for rent will cost the landlord money and time. If you have little money, there is little upside for the landlord. But, to diminish the chance even more, if you can apply some of the estate’s money and get a release from the landlord then you wont be personally involved at all (a nice result). If your dad had no money at all, you may still want to open the estate to have the court declare him insolvent. However, you would need to have an experienced Delaware County Estate Attorney tell you if that process is even worth the time and money. As to your own exposure, you should have an experienced lawyer look over the relevant paperwork. Good news or bad, it’s better to know your true position rather than let the landlord threaten you without any information.

If you have questions about Estate Probate and Litigation in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, feel free to contact our office for a free consultation.

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