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New Jersey Probate Attorney Fees

Serving as executor of a Pennsylvania estate is a time-consuming and difficult task. In addition to the emotional strength required, the executor must be able to quickly digest numerous laws and responsibilities enforced by various bureaucracies and institutions. It’s a monumental task in a foreign field. Fortunately, there is help.

Along with accepting compensation for serving in the role, an executor is strongly encouraged to hire a probate attorney. An experienced probate attorney guides an executor through the process, becomes responsible for most of the difficult tasks, and helps ensure the executor satisfies all of their fiduciary responsibilities.

In New Jersey, a probate attorney’s fees are paid out of the estate funds. New Jersey has not applied a statutory formula to the calculation of a probate attorney’s fees. In fact, some judges have suggested attorney’s fees based on a percentage of the estate cannot be imposed. Ultimately, in New Jersey, an appropriate estate attorney’s fee must be “reasonable” based on a multitude of factors.

The factors that a judge will look at to determine whether or not an estate attorney’s fees are reasonable include:

  1. the amount of the estate and the amount thereof in dispute or jeopardy as to which professional services were made necessary;
  2. the nature and extent of the jeopardy or risk involved or incurred;
  3. the nature, extent and difficulty of the services rendered;
  4. the experience and legal knowledge required, and the skill, diligence, ability and judgment shown;
  5. the time necessarily spent by the attorney in the performance of his services;
  6. the results obtained;
  7. the benefits or advantages resulting to the estate, and their importance;
  8. any special circumstances, including the standing of the attorney for integrity and skill; and
  9. the overhead expense to which the attorney has been put.

In re Bloomer’s Estate, 117 A.2d 17, 21-22 (App. Div. 1955).

As you can see, various factors influence the propriety of a probate attorney’s fees. A reasonable probate attorney’s fee should be mutually agreed to by the executor and attorney based on the division of work, nature of the estate and experience of the attorney. We will update our blog with examples of cases where probate attorney fees have been challenged and upheld—or reduced—as we find them!

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Estate Matters
The Klenk Law Blog



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